USE A METAL DETECTOR

There are many great methods to choose from for finding gold. One of the least known, but with perhaps the
largest potential of all the different kinds of prospecting and hunting for gold, is the search for pocket gold.
Only a few of the old-time prospectors knew about it
and it is safe to say eight out of ten never heard of it.
Huge nuggets and massive chunks of gold can be found high and dry with a metal detector. It comes from
quartz, the same source as placer gold, and can probably be found where ever there is placer gold.

































TRANSFERRAL OF OWNERSHIP
We do the paperwork!!!

Arizona Law requires that title to a mining claim be recorded with the county recorder in the county in which it is
located.  This claim is just outside of Payson in Gila County and is currently recorded with Gila County.  The
new owner will receive a notarized DEED,  naming them as the new owners.
$500
FOR SALE
PAYSON AZ GOLD MINE Lot,  1.25 ACRES IN
DONS GOLD #3 AMC#371736
Legal Description:
1.25 ACRE PORTION OF NE4 SEC23 T10N R9E,
Payson/Green River Mining District, Gila County, AZ

Mining claims are considered real property and as such can be bought, sold,
transferred, leased, rented, willed or inherited.

ADVENTURE, RECREATION, RELAXATION, GOLD!!!

Owning a mining property allows you the opportunity to extract valuable resources
(such as gold, platinum, silver, etc.).
Most people prospect for gold as a form of
adventure, recreation, and relaxation.
A claim owner can camp on his/her claim just
about indefinitely as long as the site is kept clean and it’s obvious a legitimate mining
operation is in progress. Geology experts say that less than 20 percent of the gold in
the Western United States has been recovered. Streams, rivers and creeks in gold
country are constantly being replenished with the valued metal.
DO I “OWN” THE LAND?

You own the mineral rights as real property and have the right to use as much of the surface as reasonably
necessary for “prospecting” and “mining” your property.
You may recreate in your spare time on an un-
patented mining claim, as well, ie
: fishing, camping, hiking, swimming, etc..

You can not build a solely recreation or residential structure.  Any building, equipment, fences, signs, roads,
any man made changes on the mining claim, must be done with a permit and be reasonably incident to mining.
As long as that is satisfied, what other use you make of it is your affair.

EAST VERDE RIVER ONLY 3 MILES!!!


HOW TO KEEP YOUR CLAIM YEAR AFTER YEAR
Once your deed is filed with The Gila County Recorder’s Office, you are the registered legal owner of your 1.25
acre claim according to Arizona law, and IT IS STATE LAW, NOT FEDERAL, WHICH GOVERNS THE
OWNERSHIP OF MINING CLAIMS.  
In Arizona there is no property tax on mining claims but there are
annual expenses/paperwork with the Bureau of Land Management.
 Your claim is part of the original
160 acre mining claim BIG GOLD FIND #3 and is still covered under Bureau of Land Management Arizona
Mining Claim #369708.  Each year to keep the claim number active with BLM someone must file either an
annual maintenance form, ($125.00) or an affidavit of performance of annual work, (showing you spent $100 or
more on the claim) or a waiver form ($5.00) with the BLM before September 1st.  This will cover the entire 160
acres.  It doesn't matter which of the owners covered under AMC #369708 does the filing, but you should
check with BLM in Phoenix (602- 417-9200) to verify that it has been done, or do it yourself.
Next to the historic Excursion Mine, just north of the Little Green Mine, the Zulu Mine, the Little Maud Mine, and
the Gold Hill Mine, jest west of the Midget Mine and the famous Ox Bow Mine.  Between the BIG GOLD FIND #3
and Highway 87 are about a dozen other historic mine sights.

DIRECTIONS






















From the Beeline Highway in downtown Payson, follow Main Street west about a mile.  When it converts to
Country Club continue west on that 1/4 mile.  When Country Club turns north, take Baby Doll Ranch Road west
- it will turn into LF Ranch Road.  Continue 2.5-3 miles as it curves south and then west until south on Forestry
Service road 193.  Follow FS193 south one mile.  You are now on the parent mining claim.  Use GPS "digital" to
find you acreage.




























The History of Gold Mining in Payson
By Stan Brown, Payson Roundup contributor
Tuesday, June 18, 2002








The first settlers to come to the Rim country were looking for gold. The California rush had run its course and
prospectors were looking for new veins of precious metal in other western states.
Soldiers, and scouts like Al Sieber, who had fought the Indian War in central Arizona, publicized word of
"remarkably rich gold-bearing float rock."
By 1875, while angry Apaches still lurked in the surrounding hills, William Burch and John Hook built the future
Payson's first house, a log cabin where the golf course is today, and staked a claim to the first mine, called The
Golden Waif.
By 1878, Sieber with his pals, William St. Johns and Sam Hill, were headquartered on Ox Bow Hill and staking
claims there and along the Sierra Ancha. That same year, Charlie Clark and a party of prospectors arrived in
Green Valley on their way to Leadville, Colo. They camped near Burch's cabin along the American Gulch, and
discovered the food most plentiful. Turkey and deer came to drink in the swampy area every morning, and they
decided to lay over a week to put up a supply of jerky.
One day, they followed the stream west and by afternoon had killed 10 deer. They hung them up to bleed and
headed back to camp for their pack animals. On the way they found so much gold-bearing rock along the
gulch, it was decided to stay and lay out claims.
"The whole world is heading for Leadville," Charlie Clark wrote, "and Leadville cannot possibly have anything
better to show than we have here ... We are in an absolutely virgin country, with high grade ore lying all around
us."


















On a trip to Phoenix for supplies, they could not refrain from telling about their good fortune and showing their
samples around. As might be expected, when they returned, they were accompanied by 20 others who began
prospecting in the vicinity of Green Valley. Among them was Lafayette P. Nash, who soon lay claim to a mine
west of Green Valley he named The Golden Wonder.
By 1881, more than 300 men were employed in the various mines of the Payson district, with new hopefuls
arriving daily. This gold rush resulted in a mining camp three miles west of the Burch cabin. The camp's
merchants Emer and Margaret Chilson bestowed the name of their daughter Mary on the community, calling it
Marysville. The Chilsons had discovered what other merchants would discover, that there was more money to
be had selling goods to the prospectors than in the actual mining.
One of the earliest of the prospectors, Charlie Clark, had not made any money from his mining claims but
Arizona had laid claim to him. He never went on to Colorado but became a prominent resident of Globe.




















The gold soon wore thin, and Marysville dwindled. Chilson traded his store to L. P. Nash for the Golden
Wonder Mine and moved to the new village of Green Valley developing along the American Gulch. By the time
the 19th century decade of the '70s turned into the decade of the '80s, cattle ranchers were rapidly laying
claim to the Rim country's marvelous grassland and mining was losing its importance.
No less disappointing was the rush to find diamonds in the Rim country. Trails were blazed to the promontory
named Diamond Point and a camp set up. The treasure turned out to be quartz crystals, traded for centuries
by the Indians, but with no market value in modern times.
Many of the gold-bearing veins occurred in a coarse-grained rock (diorite) that weathers readily, and leaves
free floating gold in abundance. This surface ore was collected and hauled on burros to the East Verde River
where water was available to work it. At the height of the gold rush, there were at least 80 animal-driven
arrastras, ore grinding stones, up and down the river.
Some of the place names in the Rim country got their handles from the prospectors. For example, Ben Cole
worked a claim one-and-a-half miles south of Payson, but whenever he came to town folks avoided him
because he was infested with lice. Thus his camp came to be named Lousy Gulch. Walker Moore was a partner
with L. P. Nash in the golden Wonder, and gave his name to a canyon that maps simply title "Walk Moore
Canyon." The Gowan mines, which are west of Payson and developed into 11 different claims, are named after
settler David Gowan of Natural Bridge fame.
By 1886, practically all the properties were shut down except for occasional renewed flurries of activity.
Periodically new corporations were formed to try again for gold in some of the old mines.
George Randall, father of Payson teacher Julia Randall, came to Payson from Colorado as superintendent of
the Grand Prize Mine on Webber Creek. Like the Ox Bow, Gowan and Golden Wonder mines, the Grand Prize
has been reopened and closed several times over the decades.
By Stan Brown, Roundup contributor
Tuesday, October 21, 2003
Come along as we continue our flight down the winding course of the East Verde River. We begin to
understand why the native peoples called it "The Crooked Water."
Having left the East Verde Estates we are venturing into some extremely rugged canyon lands where the river
cuts its way through a high mesa called Buckhead Mesa. The origin of this name seems to be lost, but reason
dictates some early prospectors found the head of a buck deer and gave the mesa that identification.
As the river cut its way in a southwesterly direction, veins of gold ore were exposed and early in the settlement
period prospectors found them and staked their claims. Some obscure and difficult Jeep trails make it possible
to drive part of the way, far enough to find the remnants of several ancient arrastras along the river.
The "arrastra" is of direct Spanish and Mexican origin, an idea brought to the New World by the conquistadors.
It was a crude device used by miners to break the precious metal from its captive rock.
It was usually fashioned from material at hand -- a low circular rock wall with a center post for a pivot-point
buried in a pile of rocks. Often the post was an axle or spindle from a wagon or mining equipment. Attached to
it was a pole, 15 to 20 feet in length, and to this, heavy chains were attached. A burro or horse was hitched to
the free end of the pole, and as the animals walked around the arrastra, the large stones were dragged over a
floor of smooth, hard rock. The gold-bearing quartz was in this way ground to a powder.
A small trickle of water was directed into the arrastra and the powdered ore turned into a thin soup. This
washed out through an opening at a low point in the pit and into a sluice box fitted with riffles. The gold
particles settled behind the riffles and could be retrieved.
For the next five or six miles the river cuts a fickle, winding way before reaching the Doll Baby Ranch and the
demarcation of the Mazatzal Wilderness area. At least six mining claims have been filed along this stretch of the
East Verde, and almost that many again can be found on the surrounding hillsides. If one is hiking in this area,
great care needs to be taken to avoid open mine shafts, although the Forest Service has seen to it that most of
them have been covered.
We encounter two claims in connection with these mines. The first is the Liberty Mine, a claim granted in 1890.
Hearsay has it that a good amount of gold was taken from this mine. However, we want to move on down the
river almost a mile to the Gowan mines.
David Gowan was a Scottish immigrant who arrived in the Rim country around 1874 and became a sometime
rancher in Gisela and then at the Tonto Natural Bridge.
However, his main passion was prospecting for gold, and in this location around 1880, he discovered a vein of
gold-bearing ore from four to 12 feet thick dipping at a 32-degree angle to the northeast. The mine is on the
west side of the river. It would become the most famous mine in the district, producing more than any other of
the Payson area mines over the next 50 years.
A 1957 mining report advised further development of this property, and said, "incidentally, the old stopes
(horizontal excavations off from the main shaft) are timbered with peeled cypress from local supply [Cypress
Thicket] and these timbers are as solid and sound as the day they were put in, 42 years ago (that would be
1915)." Like other claims in this area, they had been worked for some years before they were officially granted
by the government in 1890.
A hand written account of the area, unsigned, quoted Ralph Helm, whose family had owned these mines from
the 1930s (later leased to others), "Ralph remembers in 1948 he drove a '46 Ford sedan to the American Mine
and continued up to the Gowan ... Bulldozers were used regularly to maintain these roads. Back in the '30s the
miners were being paid $5 per week. They mined using hand steel and they would make their own bits ..." The
account goes on to identify four stone lookouts built by the miners to guard against potential Apache raids.
They are on the surrounding ridges before the trails make their final descent to the mine.








"As a young boy in the 1930s one of the miners showed Ralph the lookouts and the spent cartridges that were
laying on the ground ... There used to be a seven stamp mill 15 feet high. The tanks are cyanide tanks for
leaching out the gold. The red rock stone cabin was the powder house for storing the dynamite ... The miners
lived in stick-frame, canvas-covered dwellings, 12 to 15 miners covering two- to 10-hour shifts six days a week
... Until the '30s they used a hand-powered windlass or whim for raising or lowering the miners and the ore from
the mine. Later they used compressed air power ..."
The 1957 mine report states that "just below the mine opening, and in the bank of the river, is located the old
10 stamp mill, built by the Pacific Iron Works in 1878 ... In this mill was treated all of the ore mined in the Gowan
together with a large amount of ore from various other claims ..." This differs from the other report about a
7-stamp mill. Again, a 1939 report states, "The remains of an old 2-stamp mill are still standing on the
property." These several reports indicate how the equipment varied over the decades. Many of these old
machines and stamp mills have been taken by mining buffs over the years, some of which can be seen here
and there in the Payson area as yard decorations.
About a half-mile south of the Gowan Mine, the American Gulch enters the East Verde River. A mining claim
was filed there and given the name, The American Mine. Thus the wash that emptied there was called the
American Gulch. That "gulch," or arroyo, is the drainage for the Payson area and can be followed back to
where it parallels Payson's Main Street, creating the broad meadow that made this location ideal for settlers.
CHECK OUT OUR OTHER LOTS





Have your own PAYSON GOLD MINE

Go exploring, camping, fishing, rock hunting, and mining & FIND REAL GOLD
in this historic gold mining area. Take your family from to the fresh mountain air of the Payson for
quality time. Enjoy delicious barbecues and beautiful warm summer evenings with your family.
Listen to the wind in the pines as you sleep ever so peacefully in the great outdoors looking just 2-
3 miles from Payson

UP FOR AUCTION THE RIGHTS TO THE GOLD BEARING MINERALS ON 1.25 ACRES OF LAND IN THE
HISTORIC PAYSON/GREEN VALLEY MINING DISTRICT NEAR THE FAMOUS OX BOW MINE!



YOU CAN BEGIN ENJOYING AND MINING YOUR GOLD CLAIM NOW!

This is the only claim for sale that we know of in the PAYSON/GREEN VALLEY MINING.

DIRECTIONS

From the Beeline Highway in downtown Payson, follow Main Street west about a mile.  When it converts to
Country Club continue west on that 1/4 mile.  When Country Club turns north, take Baby Doll Ranch Road west
- it will turn into LF Ranch Road.  Continue 2.5-3 miles as it curves south and then west until south on Forestry
Service road 193.  Follow FS193 south one mile.  You are now on the parent mining claim.  Use GPS to find
you acreage.


THIS IS AN UNPATENTED PLACER CLAIM, FOR SURFACE MINING, BUT WITH A PLAN OF OPERATION, CAN
BE WORKED MORE EXTENSIVELY.  IT HAS BEEN PROPERLY LOCATED, STAKED, AND RECORDED.  FEES
ARE NOT DUE UNTIL JUNE 30TH AND SEPTEMBER 1ST 2006.  



YOUR OWN GOLD MINE???

In Arizona and California placer mining claims are selling fast and claims are being filed all over both states.
Gold prices are going up, and the use for gold is very important for technology.   Recreational working of a
mining claim is becoming popular and can be very relaxing and a great family bonding experience.  People
stuck in rush hour traffic and stressed out need a  place to take the family or friends to spend some quality time.

Look for and find native gold while relaxing with your family in Arizona’s great Rim Country.  Have your own part
of the Tonto national Forest just 2-3 miles from Payson to camp, prospect, barbecue, hike, and have that great
emotion when you actually find gold.  Work off some of the city stress and get your hearts going in this
secluded, peaceful family atmosphere just southwest of Payson.

This is not a sale of the full ownership and use of land.  You are buying the mineral rights to a certain piece of
land in the Tonto National Forest, and the right to be there looking for and mining those minerals (mainly Gold)
and to use it for ”incidental” recreation.  When you purchase a mining claim, you will own the MINERAL RIGHTS
to the property and the right to look for them and to mine them.

DO YOUR RESEARCH
Please use due diligence and research the laws of mining before purchasing a claim.  We suggest
these websites for a start:
http://www.homestead.com/theclaimpost/BUYERSGUIDE.html
https://www.blm.gov/az/
http://minerals.state.nv.us/programs/mining.htm
http://www.nuggetshooter.com/articles/ArizGoldDeposits.html
http://www.mindat.org/loc-52560.html
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/tonto/home.shtml
http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/tonto/recreation/rec-rockhounding-index.shtml
http://mypayson.com/
http://www.paysonroundup.com/


1.25 Acres just out of Payson in Gila County, Arizona. Near the old Ox Bow Mine,

GOLD IS ON ITS WAY UP! WHERE WILL IT END!  ITS NOT TO LATE TO BUY A CLAIM. BUT DONT WAIT
MUCH LONGER!
Claim Name is: DONS GOLD #3
Location: Arizona, Gila County.
AMC#371736
Township 10N Range 9E Section 23. NE4
Southwest of Payson, two miles from  highway 87.

A CLAIM WITH REAL GOLD ON IT! YOU WONT FIND ANY BETTER!.

A CLAIM NEXT TO THE OLD OX BOW MINE!!!!!!!!


There are no property taxes on mining claims in Arizona.



With ownership of an un-patented mining claim you own the mineral rights to the land. You can
camp, hunt and occupy it while looking for gold and other minerals. The government still owns most
right to the land.



GREAT GOLD! LOTS OF TRAILS FOR ATV'S, HORSES, AND CAMPING! AND GREAT SUNSETS!


Food and Spirits in the town of Payson less than 5 minutes away.


A Great investment!
Commodity prices are climbing with gold and other precious metals -
all climbing much faster than they have in years.
Mining claims are considered real property and as such can be bought, sold,
transferred, leased, rented, willed or inherited.
Arizona Mountain Properties
sales@azmp1.com       Old Robles Ranch 2C Post Office Box 1782, Cortaro AZ 85652      1-866-463-8757

Read about our BUYER PROTECTION                                      FINANCING that's simple and convenient!